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Full text of "Sketch of the James Tweed family, Wilmington, Mass."

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Given By 



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SKETCH 



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OF THE 



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ames Tweed Family, 



WILMINGTON, MASS., 



BY BENJ. WALKER 



READ AT A 



FAMILY REUNION, 



FOSTER'S POND, ANDOVER, MASS , JUNE 17, 1887. 



1 



LOWELL, MASS. 
COURIER PRESS : MARDEN & ROWELL. 

1887. 



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TWEED FAMILY. 



Name. 
James Tweed, 
Sally (Gibson) Tweed, 



Born. 
May 19, 1771. 
May 29, 1775. 



Died. 

Dec. 2, 1850. 
Dec. 19, 1861, 



CHILDREN. 



Name. 
Sally (Tweed) Buck, 
James Tweed, 
Nancy (Tweed) Harnden, 
Abigail (Tweed) Walker, 
Samuel Tweed, 
Timothy Gibson Tweed, 
Mary (Tweed) Jones, 
Charles Tweed, 
Emmons Tweed, 



Born. 
Jan. 13, 1798. 
Aug. 27, 1800. 
May 27, 1802. 
Feb. 21, 1804. 
Apr. 7, 1806. 
Nov. 21, 1808. 
Jan. 10, 1811. 
March 21, 1813, 
July 23, 1817. 



Died. 

Sept. 10, 1884. 
July 14, 1881. 
Apr. 2, 1885. 
March 28, 1855. 
June 8, 1879. 
Jan. 26, 1863. 



Dec. 25, 1858, 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sketchofjamestwe1887walk 



REMINISCENCES OF THE TWEED FAMILY, 



New England family reunions have assumed, of late, a 
character of much interest and importance. Serving, as 
they do, to renew friendships and more firmly cement the 
ties of kindred, especially when families are widely scat- 
tered and have been long separated, they gratify a desire 
which almost every person possessed of natural instincts 
must entertain, to participate, if possible, in some gath- 
ering wherein he may once more meet and mingle with 
his own immediate "kith and kin." Acting upon this idea, 
and with the conviction that family gatherings have become, 
at least, a religious duty, if not an absolute necessity, a 
few descendants of James Tweed, formerly a well-known 
and highly respected citizen of Wilmington, Mass., decided 
to make an effort for the purpose of bringing the family 
together. To that end the following circular of invitation 
was issued : 

REUNION OF THE TWEED FAMILY. 

At a recent meeting of a few representatives of the 
Tweed family, it was decided to make arrangements for a 
family gathering and basket picnic, to be held during the 
summer of 1887. The undersigned, appointed for that 



6 

purpose, take pleasure in announcing that they have secured 
the grounds at 

FOSTER'S POND, ANDOVER, MASS., 
Near the Wilmington line, for 

Friday, the 17th Day of June, 

(or Saturday, the 18th, should the 17th prove stormy) and 
cordially invite you and your family to be present. 

It is hoped, through a general response, that this reunion 
may be made an occasion of special interest to every mem- 
ber of this family, and also afford an opportunity of renew- 
ing old-time friendships and acquaintances. 

THOS. H. JONES, 
CHARLES BUCK, 

Stoneham. 

GILMAN HARNDEN, j. Committee. 

Lawrence. 

T. GL TWEED, 
BENJ. WALKER, 

Loioell. 

The arrangements for this gathering were made by the 
foregoing committee of invitation, under the immediate 
direction and supervision of Thomas H. Jones, chairman, 
— a grandson of James Tweed, — who infused great spirit 
into the affair, through his well known business energy and 
ability. To him, therefore, it is but an act of justice to 
record, are the descendants of the Tweed family mainly in- 
debted for a movement which it is hoped may prove to be 
the initiative of many other equally interesting gatherings, 



7 

so beautiful iu themselves, and which afford so much oppor- 
tunity for the enjoyment of that which cannot fail to pro- 
mote one common interest. 

The day upon which this reunion was held proved to be in 
every way propitious. The sky was clear, a gentle June 
breeze pervaded the atmosphere, the shade trees at the 
point, on Foster's pond, were a charming protection from 
a scorching sun, and each individual, old and young, seemed 
inspired with the desire to make every one else happy. The 
time was passed in rowing, fishing, social intercourse, and 
singing, for which latter entertainment ample preparation 
was made. It is almost needless to add that the entire 
Tweed family are distinguished for their musical tastes 
and abilities, and many of them are noted for their profes- 
sional excellence, both in vocal. and instrumental music. 

At noon a bountiful Collation was provided, through the 
generous contributions made by the whole company, each 
particular "basket " being laden with most tempting edibles. 
Indeed, it was difficult to determine whether the food itself 
or the" sub-committee of ladies who had arranged all with 
such exquisite taste, was entitled to the greater considera- 
tion. However that may have been, the former, at the 
moment, appealed by far the most powerfully to the appe- 
tite, while the latter had the unalloyed satisfaction of 
acknowledging the truth of the old adage that "Actions 
speak louder than words." 

At the conclusion of the repast, Mr. Jones expressed the 
wish that a complete list of the names of all present be 
made, and a committee was appointed to attend to that duty. 
(The names are given on a subsequent page.) 



8 

Mr. Jones then stated that, in view of what had been 
accomplished at this time in bringing the Tweed family 
together, it would also seem desirable to place upon record 
any historical facts or reminiscences relating to the Tweed 
family, about which little was known, except by the very 
few immediate descendants now living. He then informed 
the company that Mr. Benj. Walker, of Lowell, had prepared 
a short sketch of the early life of Grandfather and Grand- 
mother Tweed, including his personal recollections of those 
worthies, to which he would invite the attention of the 
company. 

In response, Mr. Walker read the following paper : 



Mr. Chairman, Ladies, and Gentlemen: 

Who of us has not looked forward to this 
gathering of the Tweed family with pleasurable 
emotions? Nearly every member of each branch 
of this family is present. 

Anticipating that such would be the fact, the 
thought has occurred to me that a brief sketch 
of our worthy ancestors would not only be re- 
garded with interest, but serve, in a measure, to 
perpetuate the names and memories of those 
for whom we all cherish so much affection. 
Perhaps it may also give the rising generation 
something, in a semi-historical way, that will not 
be easily forgotten. 

With these ideas and these reflections, I have 
collated such facts and incidents as my some- 
what limited resources have afforded, and, with 
your permission, will now submit the same for 
your consideration. 

Although, so far as I have been able to learn, 
this branch of our ancestors made no claim to a 
strictly English lineage, they were, as certainly 



10 

the oldest of us know, most excellent and exem- 
plary specimens of good, old-fashioned New 
England people. Pure and simple in their hab- 
its, firm and zealous in their religious notions, 
rigid in their ideas of living up to the golden 
rule, and looking upon that station in life in 
which it pleased God to place them as the one 
in which they were best fitted to serve Him, 
this eminently worthy couple, although without 
assuming any unusual degree of mental culture, 
were happy in themselves, happy in their fam- 
ilies, and lived to a ripe old age. They died as 
they had lived, in the hope of a full fruition of 
the joys which they believed await those who 
walk humbly, and follow faithfully those pre- 
cepts which are recognized as the true attributes 
which lead to immortal life. 

James Tweed, son of James Tweed, was born 
in Burlington, Mass., on the 19th of May, 177 1, 
and passed the earliest years of his life on a 
farm in that place, presumably receiving only 
the limited education which the district schools 
of those days afforded. When quite a lad, 
James left the paternal roof, doubtless to seek 
his fortune, and strayed away, not into the wilds 



11 

of the far west, but into the adjoining town of 
Wilmington, a place much more vivid in my 
early mind for the recollections of its hop-fields 
than for its commercial industries, and, as the 
saying then was, James "went out to work." 
His first engagement was with Major Jaquith, 
on what was later and perhaps is now known as 
the Sewall Buck Farm. 

How easy it is to picture this young man, full 
of courage and hope, and perhaps looking for- 
ward with ambition to the grand rounding up of 
his manhood, at the rate of "ten dollars a month 
and found;" building castles of future wealth, 
and of the time when he, too, would be possessed 
of that goodly heritage of those days — a farm 
and a family of his own. How well his hopes 
were realized will be presently seen, for when 
yet quite a young man he purchased the old 
"Tweed homestead," as some of us remember it, 
although now, as it has been for years, the prop- 
erty of that estimable gentleman, Levi Manning. 

While James was pursuing his vocation as a 
farmer, in the employ of Major Jaquith, there 
came into the family, by one of those happy 
coincidences peculiar to New England life, a 



12 

sprightly young miss, who had been engaged 
through friends of the family to take the posi- 
tion of house-girl or domestic in Mr. Jaquith's 
family. Her name was Sally Gibson, and the 
place of her nativity was Lunenburg, Mass. 
While James, therefore, was pursuing his avoca- 
tion on the farm, Sally, no doubt, was equally 
active in her household duties and, as we can 
easily imagine, in bearing the burdens which 
devolved both upon the male and female mem- 
bers of the household. Who of us cannot real- 
ize the feelings of excitement which may have 
pervaded these young hearts, which beat in 
sympathy, even in a cow-yard when the milking 
time arrived, and who has not seen a stream of 
the lacteal fluid aimed squarely at the head of a 
near friend, to call attention to the fact that there 
was not only milk in the flowing pail, but also 
the "milk of human kindness" running to over- 
flowing in the hearts of these young people? 
Imagine this young Lothario seated on a three- 
legged milking-stool, and Sally hiding her 
blushes beneath the ample folds of an old-fash- 
ioned yet immaculate sugar scooped sun bonnet 
— one of the feminine "field pieces" of those 



13 

days — and how easily do we see the budding 
of "Love's young dream," which so naturally 
ripened into a true and lasting affection. 

At any rate, it was on this farm of which we 

speak that the alliance was formed between 

James Tweed and Sally Gibson, and which 

finally culminated in their marriage in the year 

1798. 

Notwithstanding that Sally Gibson proved to 
be the blushing bride, my story would not be 
quite complete, did I not record the fact that 
James was previously engaged to a young lady 
by the name of Abigail Carter, who died, how- 
ever, during the days of her betrothal, and for 
whom an affectionate remembrance was main- 
tained in naming my mother for her. 

About the time of the marriage of James 
Tweed and Sally Gibson, James purchased the 
homestead in Wilmington, to which I have 
already alluded, and which was also known as 
"Nod," into which he took his wife, and here 
was the commencement and germ of that ances- 
tral tree of which we are all the branches. 
Here were born to this worthy couple, in natural 
and rapid succession, Sally (Buck), James, Nan- 



14 

cy (Harnden), Abigail (Walker), Samuel, Tim- 
othy Gibson, Mary (Jones), Charles, and Em- 
mons. Of these nine children, two only are 
living, Mary and Charles, the former of whom 
is present. 

The changes which more than three quarters 
of a century inevitably bring are many, yet this 
family was remarkable for the longevity of its 
members. Not one child died in infancy, which 
amply illustrates the fact that the utmost care 
and most watchful oversight of the tenderest of 
mothers was ever employed in rearing the little 
ones, who could and did, one and all, "rise up 
and call her blessed." 

Although younger, of course, than any of this 
family of whom I write, my own recollections 
of and experiences with them date back consid- 
erably more than half a century. Nothing 
could exceed the happiness of the days of my 
childhood when permitted to visit Grandfather 
and Grandmother Tweed. The cordial greeting, 
the affectionate embrace, the earnest solicitude 
to anticipate every childish want, made an im- 
pression never to be effaced, and, I venture to 
say, never to be forgotten by any of us who 
have enjoyed these experiences. 



15 

It may be egotistical in me to mention the 
following, but I really believe I was somewhat 
of a favorite with these good people, and per- 
haps may be pardoned, therefore, in repeating 
the words which once came to me from Grand- 
mother Tweed, through my dear old mother, — 
"Benny always was a proper good boy. HE 
never sarsed his grandma'am." The compliment 
to me was great, but the reflection upon some of 
those who hear me is absolutely appalling. 

I may here record that while Grandfather 
Tweed was the quintessence of good nature and 
almost the incarnation of all those qualities 
which go to make a man universally beloved, 
always, as he did, having the greatest consider- 
ation for the rights and feelings of others, your 
grandmother was full of that fire and vigor 
which left no uncertainty in regard to the fact 
that her word was law, and, although small in 
stature, she wielded great domestic power. A 
happy union of these characteristics, so strong 
in contrast, yet so harmoniously blended in "our 
uncles and our aunts," will account for the 
excellent dispositions which are so prevalent 
everywhere among our relations, and make us 



16 

all feel that "it is good to be here" on this 
occasion. 

As I write these lines I recall and can vividly 
see the various members of this family in their 
routine work on the farm. Hay-fields, corn- 
fields, and hop-yards all loom up before me; and 
the sound of the horn for dinner still dwells 
musically on my ear. I can see these uncles 
coming home in their shirt sleeves, each stop- 
ping at the well with its sparkling water and its 
creaking "sweep," just opposite the front door 
of the old house, and each by turns washing 
his hands and face in the " piggin?" which 
was kept sacred for this purpose, and subse- 
quently all sitting down and enjoying the tempt- 
ing meal which dainty and loving hands had 
provided. Thus passed the days and seasons, 
and here for thirty-three years did this worthy 
and happy family dwell. In the mean time, of 
course, the sons and daughters married and 
moved, one by one, to other spheres of labor, 
although none of them immediately went very 
far away. After a short residence in Wilming- 
ton, Aunt Sally Buck removed to Stoneham, 
where nearly all her descendants always have 



lived and still reside; James settled in Wo- 
burn; Nancy Harnden in Wilmington, where 
she remained all her life, dying only two 
years ago; Abigail Walker moved to Reading 
and afterwards to Lowell; Samuel went to 
Providence; Timothy Gibson to Lowell; Mary 
Jones to Lancaster; Charles to Woburn; and 
Emmons to Lowell, where he resided many 
years, although later he removed to Indianapolis, 
Ind., where he died in 1858. 

The first death in this family was that of 
Abigail Walker, which took place on the 28th 
of March, 1855, she having then reached the age 
of 51 years. To say that she was a lady of 
great natural refinement, of a most genial dispo- 
sition, and possessed of a character that com- 
manded the admiration and respect of all, is but 
slightly to portray her many virtues. 

"None knew her but to love her, 
None named her but to praise." 

In the natural course of events, Great-grand- 
mother Gibson, a second wife and the step- 
mother of Grandmother Tweed, was taken away 
by death. This, with other changes and circum- 
stances, necessitated the removal of Grandfather 



18 

and Grandmother Tweed to Lunenburg, to take 
the care of her father, Timothy Gibson, and also 
of his son, Uncle Ben. The father had been a 
man of unusual activity and force, but was then 
quite aged and infirm. The son, "Uncle Ben," 
was a character, and always walked to church, 
some three miles, never deigning to ride. 
Although tradition would seem to imply that he 
was mentally peculiar, not to say erratic, still he 
was a man of no little originality, and whom, by 
the way, I am said to resemble not only in name 
but especially (as you who remember him may 
easily imagine) in literary and educational 
tastes, (?) if not in the still higher range of cob- 
bling, chewing tobacco, and drinking hard cider. 

Here Grandfather and Grandmother Tweed 
continued to carry on the farm, and here also 
proved to be for many years the headquarters 
for the children and grandchildren of this worth} 7 
couple. Here also were family scenes, equally 
vivid with those of Wilmington and much more 
recent; and here also were further days of hap- 
piness and comfort for the entire Tweed family. 

It would be a pleasant task to recount the 
many incidents of their not altogether unevent- 



19 

fill life in Lunenburg, of no special account 
however at the time, but now full of interest, 
and to trace the progress of Grandfather and 
Grandmother Tweed through the years they 
resided in this place, but I must pass on. 

In the natural course of events, it being on 
the 14th of September, 1832, Great-grandfather 
Timothy Gibson was gathered to his fathers, 
leaving Grandfather and Grandmother Tweed, 
and Uncle Ben, the only occupants of the Lunen- 
burg premises. Here they continued to reside, 
Grandfather Tweed occasionally "going below" 
and driving the old cream colored nag, the 
ugliest and most treacherous, and at the same 
time the most valuable, piece of horse-flesh 
known in those days, to visit his children and 
grandchildren. This was before the days of the 
Fitchburg Railroad. It was a happy conceit of 
Grandmother Tweed to load the old gentleman 
down with a barrel of boiled apple sauce to sell 
to the relations. Once he came to Lowell with 
an ox-team and a load of charcoal, which in my 
early pride I remember to have helped him sell 
in the streets of that city at ten cents a basket, 
all the time as proud as Julius Caesar, and very 



20 

likely with a face as black as Othello's, thinking 
of the success of this great commercial transac- 
tion. Of course grandfather went home with a 
barrel of flour — it cost $5.00 in those days — 
and such other luxuries as the city afforded. 
The delight of his return was only equaled by 
the change in diet which followed. 

This leads me to pay a passing tribute to our 
good old grandmother's cooking. It was in the 
days of open fire-places, when the long black 
crane was a Fixture therein, and the teakettle 
hanging gracefully from one of the many hooks 
of various lengths, would simmer, and sing, and 
steam — what a bright old fellow Robert Fulton 
was to run a steamboat up the Hudson on the 
idea here suggested — and a huge brick oven 
was built in at the side, which would now look, 
in comparison with a modern range, like the 
Mammoth Cave of Kentucky. This oven in 
operation was a spectacle at once imposing and 
grand. Wood enough to have supplied the fu- 
neral pile of John Rogers, when he was burned 
at the stake, was crammed into it, creating a 
roar and crackling such as can be imagined at 
the burning of Rome. The bricks were heated 



21 

to their utmost capacity, after which the remain- 
ing embers were raked into the fire-place, and the 
oven cleansed by the process of using a damp 
cloth attached to a long stick. A huge wooden 
bowl filled with dough was placed in a chair at 
the mouth of the oven, when your grandmother 
armed with a gigantic wooden spoon, and, fired 
with a zeal which lent an unerring aim, landed 
little knots of this mixture all over the oven, 
and in as brief a time as it takes to give this 
description, there were ready and fished out, 
such rye drop-cakes as only a grandmother and 
a brick oven can produce. Their shapes were 
as varied as they were numerous, and the brown 
crisp edges were as picturesque and irregular as 
a range of the Rocky Mountains. No pen can 
do justice to their excellence as a breakfast cake, 
and no poet could adequately sing their praises 
when, sliced and dipped in the richest of cream, 
they appeared as toast at the evening meal. In 
those days "old rye" caused no prohibitory leg- 
islation, andfto "license" to make rye drop- cakes 
was needed, except in the matter of temperance 
in the quantity to be eaten. I might multiply il- 
lustrations of this good old lady's culinary ability, 



22 

yet she persisted, in the latter days of her house- 
keeping, in saying that she had entirely "lost her 
faculty for cooking." I might also have added, 
in the proper place, that at each succeeding trip 
"down below," recently alluded to, your grand- 
father insisted, probably as a reason for us to 
buy, that "your grandma'am had got about done 
making apple sarce." 

This family lived on, in the usual way, for 
several years, or until 1850, when Grandfather 
Tweed was taken suddenly ill, one night, and 
died. In due course of time Uncle Ben also 
departed this life. This left Grandmother Tweed 
alone, and after matters w 7 ere finally adjusted, 
the farm passed into other hands. Grandmother 
Tweed removed to Lowell, and lived with her 
daughter "Nabby," my mother, until the death 
of the latter in 1855. 

At this time grandmother removed to Stone- 
ham, where she entered the family of Aunt Sally 
Buck, and here completed her long and useful 
life. She died in the year 186 1, and her re- 
mains, with those of her husband, repose in the 
cemetery at Lunenburg, Mass. 

In view of what I have written, and with a 



23 

sincere desire to do honor to the dead, this re- 
union has also been arranged in the hope that it 
may afford some gratification to the living. 
From a comparatively humble, yet most worthy 
source, stand before me, in goodly numbers, four 
generations of relations. Among these are gen- 
tlemen representing various branches of business 
nearly all of which are the growth of the pro- 
gressive age in which we live. All of us, 
without exception, so far as I know, are respecta- 
ble and hold honorable positions in the commu- 
nities where we reside, and if none of us are 
fabulously wealthy, I believe we all have quite 
the equivalent, for the bible says, "A good name 
is better than great riches." 

We are here today to renew friendships and 
acquaintances, as many of us, in pursuing our 
vocations in life, seldom meet, and to assure each 
other of our mutual friendly regard and person- 
al interest. 

Who has not felt the thrill which the fact of 
meeting a blood relation affords, and the inspi- 
ration which grows out of the knowledge that we 
as relatives have a claim upon, and, so to speak, 
a right to each other? So far as I know, this sen- 



24 

timent is universal among us. At any rate, my 
ideas of good feeling, good fellowship, good na- 
ture, good citizenship, and downright good peo- 
ple, are thoroughly exemplified in this family, of 
which I am proud to be a member, and my ear- 
nest desire, in bringing this desultory sketch to a 
close, is that we may cherish and cultivate those 
feelings and interests which just such gatherings 
as these cannot fail to inspire, and that we may 
live our lives in full harmony and sympathy 
with each other, leaving all at last, in the belief 
that whatever others may say of us, our kindred 
have always proved to be our steadfast and abid- 
ing friends. Many of us, indeed, have inherited 
other cognomens than that of this honored 
family, but 

"Just as a Scotchman vaunts his plaid, 
Where'er his wandering steps may lead, 
Boasts of his clanship, feels his blood 
Warm at the thought and quicker speed, 
So here are we, of various names, 
Who each his right of kinship claims, 
And boasts, with pride, his bit of Tweed." 



RELATIVES PRESENT. 



Timothy G. Tweed, 
Gordon Tweed, 
Brenda Tweed, 
George W. Tweed, 
Henry Tweed, . 
Edwin Harnden, . 
Molly E. Harnden, . 
Martha Harnden, . 
Daniel B. Harnden, . 
Ned Harnden, 
Ethel Harnden, 
Mary Harnden, 
Gilman Harnden, 
Sarah K. Harnden, 
Henry Harnden, 
Mabel F. Harnden, 
Henry Perley Harnden, 
Otis Harnden, 
Alice M. Harnden, . 
Althea M. Harnden, 
Florence E. Harnden, 
Harry Foster Harnden, 



Lowell, Mass. 






Boston, 
Lowell, 



u 
u 
u 



Groton, 

Lawrence, 

a 

Haverhill, 

a 

a 

u 
u 
a 

u 



26 



John W. Harnden, . 
Emma A. Harnden, 
Arthur W. Harnden, 
Ida A. Harnden, . 
Hattie Abbott, 
Clarence T. Abbott, 
Elizabeth Jenkins, . 
J. W. Jenkins, 
Charles W. Jenkins, 
Martha Jenkins, . 
Ethel M. Jenkins, . 
Lizzie M. Jenkins, 
George Dane, . 
Anna Dane, 
Mattie Dane, . 
Mary Jones, 
Thomas H. Jones, 
Carrie Emerson Jones, 
Benj. Walker Jones, 
Lydia A. Jones, . 
Addie E. Jones, 
John F. Jones, 
Frances L. Jones, 
Belle F. Jones, 
George Jones, . 
Mary Jones, 
Charles Buck, . 
C. F. Buck, 
Clara Buck, 
Joseph Buck, 



Wakefield, Mass* 



a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


Woburn, 


U 


Boston, 


a 


Wakefield, 


a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 


Lowell, 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


Stoneham, 


a 




a 




a 




a 




i i 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 


Woburn, 


a 



27 



Sophia C. Buck, . 
Hattie J. Buck, 
Joseph H. Buck, . 
Mabel F. Buck, 
Willie A. Buck, . 
Grace T. Buck, 
John C. Buck, 
Emma J. Buck, 
John E. Buck, 
George Green, 
Mary Jane Green, 
George N. Green, 
Minnie Green, 
Willie C. Green, 
Walter T. Green, . 
A. M. Latham, 
Esther J. Latham, 
Harry M. Latham, . 
Abby Robinson, . 
Abby Maria Robinson, 
Carrie Hayward Robinson, 
Benj. Walker, . . 
Mary E. Walker, . 
Mary C. Walker, 
Gorham Smith, 
Walter Allen Smith, 
Dorcas Berry, 
Charles Berry, 
Abby W. Bancroft, 
C. W. Pitman, 



Woburn, 


Mass 


u 


u 


u 


u 


u 


a 


u 


Li 


u 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


Stoneham, 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


u 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


Lowell, 


u 


u 


a 


u 


a 


Salem, 


(t 


u 


a 


Reading, 


Li 


u 


a 


Boston, 


a 


Wakefield, 


a 



m 



Emma G-. Pitman, 
Marion Pitman, 
Thomas Merriam, 
Mary C. Merriam, 
Florence C. Merriam, 
Frank A. Merriam, . 
Grace H. Merriam, 
D. Howard Robbins, 
Lizzie Robbins, 
Marion Robbins, 
Nancy Ethel Lewis, 



Wakefield, Mass. 

u 

Woburn, 



u 



Wakefield, 



a 
a 



INVITED GUESTS, 



William H. Carter, 
Judith D. Carter, 
Maria W. Carter, . 
Ada M. Carter, 
Ellen Wheelock, . 
Rebecca L. Blanchard, 
Harry Blanchard, . 
Lillian Blanchard, 
Harriot G. Ames, . 
Allie G. Ames, 
Henry N. Ames, . 
Juliet S. Gowing, 
Levi Manning, 
Silas Brown, 
Abigail Brown, 
Minnie C. Go wing, . 
George Marden, . 
Harriet Buck, . 
Nathan J. Shattuck, 
Hattie M. Shattuck, 
Wallace G. Shattuck, 
Everett Daniels, 



Wilmington, Mass. 

(£ u 

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. Auburn, Maine. 
Wilmington, Mass, 



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Mary Gates, 
Josie C. Hill, . 
William F. Holt, 
Vasti B. Holt, . 
Louisa Swain, 
Kittie M. Gove, 



Stoneham, Mass 
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Wilmington, 



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(Sept., 1886, 20,000) 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



One volume allowed at a time, and obtained only by 
card ; to be kept 14 days (or seven days in the case of fiction 
and juvenile books published within one year) without fine ; 
not to be renewed ; to be reclaimed by messeng-er after 21 
days, who will collect 20 cents besides fine of 2 cents a day, 
including Sundays and holidays ; not to be lent out of the 
borrower's household, and not to be transferred; to be re- 
turned at this Hall. 

Borrowers finding this book mutilated or unwarrantably 
defaced, are expected to report it; and also any undue delay 
in the delivery of books. 

* % *No claim can be established because of the failure of 
any notice, to or from the Library, through the mail. 



The record below must not be made or altered by borrower, 







S?3«BB9™ • »,v" 



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